Future-focused companies aren’t afraid of rebranding – and often it’s a must

 

  • John Lewis and Waitrose rebranded to make their employees more visible
  • Rebranding could help Battersea to appeal to people’s compassion
  • YouTube’s race to dominate the streaming field starts with a new name and higher fees
  • Why did Uber decide to rebrand again?
  • Céline’s shoppers aren’t happy with the brand’s new logo
  • Is your company ready for a change?

 

The first few months of establishing a company and growing a business are always exciting. But then, after a few years, you might feel your business is stuck in a rut. The work has become mundane, and profit has slowed. All this puts your business existence under threat. To avoid disaster, organisations should consider rebranding. Though it’s often regarded as a risk, change is necessary in the business world. Since the global demographic is changing, businesses should, too.

Rebranding can be done in several ways, from changing the brand’s name and logo to switching to a different target audience, it’s all about taking a new direction. If done right, rebranding can help brands re-engage their previous customers and attract new ones.

 

John Lewis and Waitrose rebranded to make their employees more visible

In 2018, the chain of high-end department stores John Lewis decided it’s time to rebrand. The design consultancy firm Pentagram was hired to create a new brand identity for John Lewis, as well as its partner Waitrose, by adding “& Partners” to the companies’ names. What these companies wanted to do with this move is to make all of their 83,000 employees, who own shares of the company, more visible. They hope that the rebranding strategy will help them stand out from the competition.

 

Rebranding could help Battersea to appeal to people’s compassion

Pentagram also took part in rebranding a UK-based charity organisation, Battersea. The rebranding included removing the words “Dogs & Cats Home” from the charity’s name, and adding the tagline “Here for every dog and cat.” As Hatched reports, the previous name often confused people into thinking that the charity provides a permanent home for cats and dogs, when in reality, it re-homes them with new families. The added tagline reveals the charity’s main goal and commitment to rescuing animals. Battersea also got new abstract illustrations designed to “appeal to people’s compassion and humanity, without victimising or stigmatising the animals”.

 

YouTube’s race to dominate the streaming field starts with a new name and higher fees

Tech companies are also undergoing a rebranding process. In 2018, the Google-owned YouTube Red, a subscription streaming service, was rebranded into YouTube Premium. Ever since its launch back in 2015, the service, which provides users with access to original content such as shows and movies, has often been mistaken for another website with a similar name. YouTube’s rebranding also included raising the platform’s subscriptions fees and making the service slightly more expensive than the previous version. Though YouTube is the world’s most popular music streaming service, when it comes to streaming TV shows and movies, Netflix, Amazon Prime, and Hulu still dominate the market. However, the new rebranding could help YouTube get a slice of that multi-billion-dollar pie.

 

Why did Uber decide to rebrand again?

Before starting a rebranding journey, organisations should take consumer opinion into consideration. If the new rebranding meets customer expectations, it will certainly have a direct impact on the company’s profit. Uber realised this back in 2016, after it rebranded its logo and ditched its popular U. Consumers didn’t like the new logo, and Uber faced a lot of criticism. In 2018, this ride-sharing business decided to make things right, and it created something that’s “instantly recognizable, works around the world, and is efficient to execute”. But before making any new changes, Uber collected feedback from its audience. The results have shown that consumers want a simple and bright wordmark written on a black background, all of which Uber has taken into account when designing the new logo.

 

Céline’s shoppers aren’t happy with the brand’s new logo

Uber isn’t the only one that made a rebranding mistake. Fashion lovers weren’t pleased when the brand Céline unveiled a new logo over Labour Day weekend in 2018. What made consumers dissatisfied is that the new logo no longer had an accent over the letter “e”. By removing the accent, the company’s creative director, Hedi Slimane, wanted to make the brand’s logo more alike to the original version from the 1960s. However, fashionistas saw it as “cheap and tacky”. For Chris Wu, a partner at the Wkshps design studio, removing the accent was a smart move. As he explains, the new logo targets a global demographic and enables the brand to be more recognised and discussed, and its name to be easily typed out.

 

Is your company ready for a change?

Once a business starts to get boring and outdated, it’s time to rebrand it. Rebranding, if done right, will breathe new life into any organisation and give it a fresh look and feel. It will help a company to differentiate itself from its competitors, and eventually grow its business